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PROPAGANDA LEAFLET'S 



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ASSEMBLED AND PREPARED BY G — 2 SECTIC 



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FOREWORD 

During World War II, Psychological Warfare became recog- 
nized as an important weapon at the disposal of all combatants. 
Its dual aim was to build up the user's home-front, his troops, 
and his allies; and at the same time attack, undermine and destroy 
those of the enemy. Truths, half-truths, lies and rumors were 
spread by as many different media as there were means to carry 
the written and spoken word. 

In the field of propaganda, which was the principal tool 
employed, the Germans became past masters. The methods and 
effect of one phase of this propaganda, that of "selling a bill of 
goods" not only to Germany herself but to the world at large, 
is already well known. It is with another phase, which may be 
called Battle Field Propaganda, that this booklet is concerned. 

On the following pages are reproductions of a few of the 
propaganda leaflets that were employed by the Germans against 
units of VI Corps during World War II. These leaflets were 
occasionally dropped from airplanes but were more often fired 
by means of a special artillery or mortar projectile. Some of 
these leaflets were found to be clever and well done, while others 
were crude, makeshift, and, judging by our standards, often in 
poor taste. 



The leaflets that follow are only a sampling of the total 
encountered, but they serve to illustrate the many different 
themes used by the Germans. Many are an attempt to split 
the Allies, while others attempt to destroy the soldiers' laith in 
the home front, his Commander" in "Chief, his girl, his friends, 
and his country. Much of the propaganda is Anti*Semitic which 
was a favorite Na2i theme, while a good deal of it appealed 
directly to the individual soldier in telling him that "death awaited 
him as long as he continued the fight". 

In addition to the small pamphlets, a bi-monthly newspaper, 
dubbed "The Lightning News", was used by the Germans. Also 
there were daily broadcasts by "Sally" over Jerry's radio station 
and the frequent use of front line loud=speakers. But whatever 
the method, and regardless of the words used, the idea behind 
the whole program was to make the soldier soft, unhappy, lose 
the desire to fight, and desert. 

It is difficult to gauge the effect of this propaganda on each 
individual soldier; however, on this command as a whole, it 
achieved practically nothing, as the morale of the combat troops 
was excellent throughout the many extended and difficult cam- 
paigns. Thus, the net results of Goebbels' efforts in Battle Field 
Propaganda against VI Corps is this souvenir booklet dedicated 
for future generations to read. 









i 



• j.e 



i 



ON THE ANZIO BEACHHEAD 
AGAINST 
BRITISH AND AMERICAN TROOPS 
JAN 2 1944 — JUNE 6 1944 



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, Mil UmittS GiftttiHi cfjrrm- 
of tht { kxita) dUtcs of SXmtrit* , AmiarS 



a membtrofAe l#1Sc3 &nis fjfhtvtt 

WHIS *DlPLOMA^ 

ix rrtrofHitiim of j/ourstrvieet i* keipiltf 
to UUrtJUt our- 3tvidtH2i 

A «ic PWf afyeumturniitfkomc agtii 
iww < *™ p ***»f&5 to recet't*, mrer* aura* 

jpJ»j»9 <«2 ™ mmmttmf m» At vomJttr 
to the HOtitrd cflWfef cirrW &orfTeraricH, 

on* ftlttraf Htorm 
JOHft every lex fays. 

(H 8 .Sriouia the dtvuJe.«<H of the UmW 
5UUS Sttei ftirporatum AtttUM after thtWtr 
thudki^ttum it nuUiftti Tin monet*™ claim 
u bma*J up MM ihe ««M* of ihii dtpWa ?; 




<€C 



£ 







SOLDIERS OF THE UNITED NATIONS IN ITALY 
PROUDLY DYING FOR WALL STREET 1 



I'hin diploma in ornamented wilb portrait* ol prominent 
American* (or whom you. an Ideall*!* In Ihe truest Knc, 
arc Mtriflcinu your health and life, ll ahull not be Ihe 
only reward lhal Wall Street i> granting yon ! 

For Ihia^acrllce la alao lo reeeive lasting recognition In 
Ihe ahape of Ihe huge memorial depicted below and 
created by one of American beat aculptora ,■■ 

It will be placed at Ihe foot of Wall Street aa an eternal 
expreaelon of gratitude for the willlngneaa of tboac •oldlera 
who patiently fought «nd died lor Wall Slreel. all hough 
they hid the <h*nt* to spend Ihe War in a Camp in 

, unlit repatriation ! 





WHO HELPED TO PAY US 
A DIVIDEND Or 

4* '>* 

a ojuteful"Wau STREET 



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*l ■MM« 



Uke 5<rf1/(Hc £>fi &W 




ll was a rud* awakening for har ,",.,„. 



THE MOMENT SHE DREADED 



1 orgoHen on- ihe days when shapely Josn Hopkins hn» 
Hlill selling ribbons in a 5 and 1C cts, atore in Sew \«rk 
Gly. As private secretary lo" slick Snin Levy, big BKtBCjJ 
maker in I he war business, she rose to he a sugar ditddj s 
darling^ 

Sam didn't have any C»sh when he got starled, and he 
doesn't tike In be reminded of His early days on the lower 
Raul Side. The war was just Ihe right thing for him. I. ike 
many other home- warrior* he made the (grade piling up 
dough and grow ins fat on I he sacrifices of I hose young 
American boys fighting on foreign battlefields. 

At heart Joan is not a bad woman. For oxer two years 
she had nol seen her Ranee, clean-cut Hob Harrison, whom 
she cares for very much. Bob was shipped lo Europe lo 
fight for Ihe cause of Sam Levy and his kind. 

Two years it a long time for any girl. 

For more than half a year the had nol heard from Bob. 
He seemed lo be among the missing. 

Some sunny afternoon, however, just when Joan and Sam 
were stepping out of fashionable Bon* it Teller's shoo on 
Fifth Avenue, she wag struck speechless bytfte high I of 
a man in uniform. 

It was a rude awakening for her. And il was also a 
dreadful blow to Bob, lor II was he who suddenly stood 
opposite her • on crutches, one leg amputated. 

Two lives - lost to one another forever. 

toot for the other pictures oj this series 



--*ST! 



3fc gWljou, JeftBeldnd 



* 







To-4» 9 f^r#«B*rJfa»ii N? kdu. t . 



SAM KNOWS WHAT HE WANTS 

Two yeors ago, comely Joan Hopkins was still 
a salesgirl behind the ribbon counler in a New 
York 5 & 10 cts. store getting 12 dollars a week. 

To-day she is pulling down 60 bucks as the 
private secretary to Sam Levy. Business is ex- 
■ceHer>t- <jnd S a m- iyinotang~o~pl)e~ot" dough 
on war contracts, 

FOR HIM THE SLAUGHTER 
CAN'T LAST LONG ENOUGH. 

Sam has no scruples about getting a bit intimate 
with Joan, And why should he have any ? Tall 
and handsome Bob Harrison, Joan's fiance, is 
on the front, thousands of miles away, fighting 
for guys like Sam I »vy. 

Joan. Jovej Sob, but she doesn't know 
WREN HE WILL COME BACK. 

look [Of the other picture* oj this jerte*. 



<7£e Qu&ljtHi, Jjeft Befu'»tt 







Poor Utile |md! S/i* fa *lilt thinking o\ Hob. 



I II F WAY OF ALL FLESH 



When pretty loan Hopkins wan Mill standing behind I In 
rjhhnn counter ol ti 5 & 1C els. store un 3rd \venuc in 
New V ork City, she never dreamed ol ever seeing the 
interior ol a duplex .Park Avenue apartment. Neither <ii<l 
young Bub Harrison, the man she love*. Hub was drafted 
and sent In I he battlefields in Kurope thousands u{ miles 
away from her. Through l.uzares Employment \genc.v 
loan got a job an private secretary uilh wily Sam Levy. 
Sam in piling up big mon«v on war eon tracts. Should the 
slaughter end \ery soon, lie would suffer an apoplectic stroke. 

Now Joan knows what Bob and his 
pals are fighting for. 

Joan always used to look up to Bob an the guiding star 
of her life, and she was at ill a good girl when she started 
working for Sam Levy. But she often dot ihe blues think- 
ing of Boh, whom ahe hadn't seen for over two years. 
Her boss had an understanding heart and was always 
very kind to her. so kind indeed, that he often invited her 
up to hfs place. He had always wanted to show her his 
"etchings". Besides, Sam wasn't stingy and en eh time Joan 
came to see him, he gave her the nicest presents. Now, 
all women like beautiful and expensive things. But Sam 
wasn't the man you could ploy for a sucker. He wanted 
something, wanted it very definitely 

Poor little Joan I She is still thinking of Bob, 
yet she is almost hoping that he'll never return. 

look [or ihe other pictures of this ienes 




■■■■■I 






i\ 



// 



/ a faartij 



A CONTRIBUTION B* OUR SOCIFTr RtPQPT 



I < was a charming idea of Mr Levy, big luunitions nunu 
fjrturer, to invite those of his female employe** who have 
a friend or fiance at the Netturo front. He had considerately 
called it a " Nrttuno Party * A large number of armaments 
manufacturer* mi also present. 

At first the girls, of course, were somewhat reserved, but 
the whisky and the other drinks were so excellent that soon 
everybody was having a grand time. There was only one 
embarassing Incident - when one of the girl* suddenly left 
the party, exclaiming : 

"I only hope that my Joe over there in Europe is not going 
to be so dumb as to 

ri«k his life or health r / /'DOWT9E CO/! \ 

for you profiteers ¥.-W'M- M f i J0E ' S A COUPLt \ 

and racketeer. I " 

Apart from this ''slip 
of the tongue' nothing 
else spoiled the fun 
of the party. 

It i* very comforting 
for the boy* at the 
front to know {hat 
their girl I - when thjtv 
are pretty - are well 
taken care of. 









N E T T U N 



.*$>&+ 




.VNETTUNO 



■v* 




AN AND BRITISH SOLDIERS ! 



i Or COURSE, you have been in Hals (^t sooo lun^' 
/a time, and vou know bv now (hat good old Nepfune 
is called Nettuno in Italian. Already tkmisand* *ui ■ 
thousands of your pals visited him and pre lei te>! \y <■< * 

•A*' itn ^ ,m ^rcver. 

This time, however, the god of the sea was tickled ti> 
deatli that you did him the honor of calling on him in 
the verv place that was named atter him. 

Neptune was just starting a new collection of American 
and British ships, tanks, pi spear and gun for his armoury 

" V ti> L LJ', r f** J * ' "" **"-~ **"**k**ft rfc| Tvrj^ienian 

II tit" damxjtS^plmsed. *B*h. '-V u l i r urn pie rnn t ri - 

Seed the types oi your obu$pB>eht' 

□ice uniforms* of your Tel low sol- 

in* were kind enough to sweep 

ft beaches of his belove&Nettuno.'* 

od terms with the old guy; 
term to settle doz*. n ?t •if/i It int. * 

*j HG ASIDE, BOYS. 

,ne British- American landing at Nettuno is developing 
into ft bell of ff "business for your forces. 

You ond your pol» will bav 
to, boor tho conuqutncesl 










*4 




t 

■' 

f 

r 



THE BEACH-HEAD 



is going to bo tho big blow 
against tho Germans. 

Wasn't that the slogan when the Allied 
troops landed at Nettuno on January 21st? 



TODAY 



exactly three months of hard fighting have 
passed and you can now celebrate this event 

But it is still merely a beach-head, paved with the 
skulls of thousands of British and American soldiers I 

The Beach -Head has 
become a Death's Head! 

It is welcoming You with a grin, and also those 

who are coming after you across the sea for an 

appointment with death. 

Do they know what they are in for? 

Yes, they feel that they are landing on a 

DEATH'S HEAD 




\jhe mountains and 
valleys of 'Sunny Italy 




..Ahey want to $eeyoi 
an APPOINTMENT WITH M 



Every mountain and every valley In Sunny Holy has on enor 
out appetite. For weeks and weeks Ihe Allien have heon feet. 
In* MOUNT CASS1NO wllh bomb*, shells and streams of bloou. 

And which ovor woy you Kim, you only »• mort 
such mountain-melecks waiting hungrily for YOU. 




// you are roinanifc 

uou milt be g fitful to Fat* for giving yoa ffe« chance of a free 
burial on come pfcturenn'* ktlUSdt trader In* bfve safe* o/ Sunny 
fla/a. yoar araee wifl be in earth unaed up with a alortouf part 
and covered a>Mh the nrfaa of andenl twitting* and lamp/es. 

tf von «ra NOT rosuatfc - 
wetb SMybe yau era faying,."! wan) to fo home!" 
la any cam* • A 4 plot haa- b*aa reserved lor yon. 



Com* to iiHi}j*Jbr<i^tj,if< irt'th DEATH! 



f 







CASSINO 




IS STILL IN GERMAN HANDS 

<n spite of 
HUGE ALLIED LOSSES! 

For «**L# and w«U the \lllen hn*a b*n thro»laf 
nil Ihclr reaooreaa inlo llir hallla o! ( a»«lno. 



BUT ALL IN VAIN I 

Ihc hanvic.l ho in hard mint of (hi Italian campaign, by arlillaTy and Irani la* 
air, MM 10 hi an! ana) Ihc German defender*. _ 

And in fad obnol SCO Allied bomber, dropped mora than 23CC loan ol M. r- a 
on Ibe lillte town ol Caaaino in the ina« ol a few honra! 

Bui «han lbs poundias [nm Ihc air and the ner»«-«rackl»« 1-rr.a* M«M«4. 
,h. O.rm.n- ro« Iron, Iheir fo.hola. and re«lUd In .^-''^"i** 11 ?* 
Ihc m.««d nllaek. ol the 2nd. N«. Zealand and -Ith. ••<«« Di.hnW. -ha 
..arc aupporfed hy aumeroui lanka. 

Day ailar day Lhe lad. N« Zwlaod DM.Inn raaeaiad l»*i* .Jl-cka.a«d .M«|k 
■hay tall IhemaeUee Ihc beal divi.ioo to tht Empire, [bay Jailed lo n.akc.tbceUant- 
ctl till lljl Their aid foe. iba German paratroops -ho had drWce, then, tram 
Cral* in mi. proved ln.maeJ.ea -tope" a*ela .ad .Imply mow*. *»•• »*e 
«b. India* Ditlalo*. 

Could thai he the German soldier, who according 
to Allied press and radio reports, i* war-wears 
in the fifth year of this conflict? 

AND NOW WHAT ABOUT THE NETTUNO FRONT? 
IS THE 




SLAUGHTER 



TO BE 



REPEATED THIBET 



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. 









itfti. r)[j. it. ivu 



■ 




1&ch man's Witrf PmtrWw's 



i 

campaign apeecheR? 

i0>td r(j«c frnm onr Mil 

r dependents, uui 45 milium 

■ e UNA I'lTr liting in miHtry,, 

- and he knew il. 
j 10 be done. 

.nlecL Ihc fairy - talf thai the Win I'owtrv 

short of war, made them shorter 
-< fer until he had H I S war I 

) \>\ rd- with one Alone by plunging hie country lulo t^Br: 

. tj'ii rid of the unemployed by shipping rn .t at them io Nit 
IcU of Jurope as cannon fodder* I he rewl v. v ftbiuirLiHcd by 
iiHBPU4.'tll induKlrv in temporary Vturlimv jab* 

COttu, hv pm»Kt:d fal go* err. men I onlrnel* on to h!tt rich ■pO'imorn. 
.ne Buructis. I L'hmiin*, Morgenlhutihi, Unrburgi. GiLiulrergft And the 
liikf-. Hi lik reMnrcting I hem f * i r Iheir canti donation* during election 
iiinf. lhU KHunvi'il Kflni; jh reaping coIo*b*I profit* uw unufll- 

So you nee I hat Mr, Rook? veil had flt-od 

reason?* Tor running after 1 he war. 

Due of hiic anokettmuK |ume« 1 1 . Mr Grow |r.. president of Ijie McCirnu* 

llil!-l 'ublitthtng Company. Inc . put il bluntly by »rilin« in Ihc March 1942 
inmuc of I hi- magufLnt *' Atialton," 

"And this, very definitely, is OUR war." 

The American people, howru-r. in their unimpeachable judgement act hint 
righl hy laying: 

This is the RICH man's war 
and the POOR man's fight 



MONEY -MAKING M.ri! 




' s 



^t AFFAIR FOR A SEIECT FtW," | 



I 



*n paper New Leader in Decerr^er 

1945, a.^ ...rttf-foflbw^g FACTS issued by the U. S. D *"" 

of Commerce : • j 



H Profits o) U. S- Industry 
1939 1942 



billion 



t 



20.i 

billion % 



Income from Heel |»Wg 



1939 



4.3 



t 



1942 



33 
t 



billion 



That' j fog Business for rhe rich - bur not for you I 
And rhe paper continued : 

" These figures prove that never before in rhe history of 
capitalism hove such huge fortunes been accumulated 
by o select few. In spite of this ' Gold Rush - ' the 
worker'* wages hove not increased * 



It truly is a "Rich bur's war bit a poor man's fight!" 



And so that's why you're here in Europe - making this socrifice 

of life and health I 

If you should return home you won't hove to work again, for 

the Government is already reckoning on ot least 12 million 

unemployed after thit war. 

So you will be able to devote yourself wholly to your hobbies, 

rest your weary bone* in the tun, and comfort yourself with 

the thought, , 



" I KELFfD WALL STREET RAKE IN THE CASH " 







SALLY, the RADIO-GIRL 

from station 

"JERRY'S FRONT" 

invites you to a 

FREE RETURN TRIP TO AMERICA 

via 
GERMANY 

Solly soys YOU CAN LIVE IN PEACE and. 

COMFORT ar one of the camps, opfra red under 

the ouspices of Hie, International Red Cross. 
i 

She rh inks .you ought to rake along a woolen 
blanker, some underwear and an extra p'dir 
of pant*. 

DON'T HESITATE to make good use of this 
offer while there is a chance. 

"SUMMER IN GERMAN* IS THE 
PERFECTION OF THE BEAUTIFUL." 



1 1 >•' 



I 



(MARK TWAIN) 

A I (XI -3.44 






IMPORTANT NOTICE 

In case you are taken prisoner, you will very 
likely wish to have your relatives informed 
with as little delay as possible mar you are 
alive and out of danger. 

JERRY'S FRONT RADIO 

has arranged to announce the names and 
addresses of prisoners of war and their serial 
numbers. The announcements will be made- 
three times daily 

You will understand how valuable this service 
is when you consider that your relatives are 
spared the dreadful feeling of anxious suspense 
concerning your fate. 

Be prepared ond fill in this blank. It will 
be useful to you if you should be captured. 







FILL IN THIS BLANK AND KEEP IT 

USE BLOCK LETTERS. 
TO BE TRANSMITTED BY JERRY'S FRONT RADIO: 



H. 



Rank: 

Serial Number: 
Address: 
Town; ... 

Country; ... 






Street 



In lh'l» panel write a ithort rnewwtfe of no) more 
than 15 wo#da which will be Ira nam (tied by radio 









— 2.— 







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Z^ ^&<l> ^^^ / <&**^f a- j&ua&ih&is strict 
stftt+ct s6&h£ dele <Jc4U ^nsast#us*t&c tv«i*. 



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(tiWwtf yWk ^^CL^j^a "far oHHA-lj 4^-o-icfc 

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~bft& MttftfoS are 'tease- fending "your women. 
Their pockets ft* If of cash and ho work to do, the 
boys from overseas are having the time of their fives 
in Merry Of J End tana 1 . 

Crlnd what young woman, singtc or married / could 
resist such "handsome brute from the wide open 
spaces * to have dinner with, a cocktail at some 
night- cfub , and afterwards ....... 

(JTfnyway, so numerous have become the scandats 
fharaff England is talking about them now. 




loo bad 

if it should hit you in ike last minute. 




^W <Jbttm'ctw$ ate $&w> 






ffirifisfi Sorters! 



ifonjre fighting and 
dying far away from 
your country while 
fhelfanh are puffing 
up Hteir tents in 
Merry Old England 
They've got lots of 
S/tfney and loads of 
■' to rlrasr ath ■ 
' omen 







■ 



L* n 






Aliiertet 



vof 



Rot*** 






divisions 
r cUtd near Rome, 

German roas fal pas ilk ws 
broken fhrouqli . i^Afsm 
fighting line outflanked 
Bi^ en circle mar I battle 
is sfarh'ui*. 



/ "6 leufffit which we are showing you 
in the original and in translation on the reverse 
side was dropped over our lines by order of 
your command. ' 

Allied diviiions landed near Rome T 

"There are many roads that lead to Rome." 
but none for you. 

Gtrmon coastal positions broken through? 

Do you iRI^hink so to-day ? 

Main fighting line outflanked t 

You don't mean by chance our lines? Nu- 
merous of your units have been cut off from 
their lines of communication and taken 
prisoner. 

Big encirclement bottle j» irortirtg ? 

Who is fighting with hie back to the sea, 
surrounded on all sides by a powerful op- 
ponent ? 








AMERICAN SOLDIERS! 



MWMHHM 



■ia wwiiw iii 




■ - ~w 

Remember those happy days when 
you stepped Out with ypjwyaest girl 
"going places and doing things 1 '? 

M&' mailer 







, whether you two were enjoying a 
nltQ juicy/lsteak at some tony restau- 
rant or Watching a .thrilling movie 
m your favourite stars performing, 
^c^ifie'mg to the hit of a swing band 

ytify were 
at is Left of all this? 

ng! Nothing but days and 
nights of h^ heaviest fighting and 
^ for many of you 

">THING BUT A °UIN WOO0IN CROSS 

in foreign soar 



*\ 





W*. - rh* totd-trtOn rhafrghr.. y A <g 
who ho** ro itidx tbfl'i n*cfc» out i^o take * * 
ogoimi tn# woy tome ehnlfen aenttb'-ir> hOmo 
**brain war" 

it mutt b* nice re *ito^ home bphjnd th t * * 
in all the four corner* of th* world, - boMkl ri» i 
only onevway and th* Juries ore mov«d down by t"h# umple ttrok* 0* o P* rt 
' rig»t be mc* lo corr* on the h»nd of war portrayed in the revypi On uftner : 
Jong Vgged, grtipe-braa>l*d gJH in g cute little uniform iqgeoli ■ ftu-i J" - g ■* 
gry p 'ouvy^demoroliifld G*finont wet 'heir pa nu ond 'each for the iky When wo to* ' *• 

that, we teei tike reaching for lOmo'fhini; qy t** fjifff*** 
Why i*f enough to rnak* a decent guy pukr n r*i >f * - 
oil thci* fucVirtg r*vLr*} ond newtpope" E'Ofh 

We protest ag 




we hjye to 






'-■#:- 



V. 



fc 



none will our 
mother,, wJym, 



intof* «.nd ****th*urfi think of us w*i»n they gat 
a toil* of this propcgcindcMtep Nipt rhen flidt- 
h oi rod h om* -f r o nt wa rri'on hov* brafted f Of home) 
coniumptTont Af* we ihootiiig*gall«ry hoim I 
Th e lol d i e r» who c/oo\ 1 5 000 Ruislon tank* i n tft* 
ipoc* of only i*verol w«k*, take, Cf*te in four 
doyt, And force wi to giv* *v*ryf Mng «wVi got for 
39 days for tho poueuion of Sicfhjp, ot* no emu* 
iing fittl* flggrei in rcvuftt or ncgas<no ttoriet. 
They ore Hi* God-damn#d fanatical G#ri*vn *of* 
dieft that w a have pot oequoirued with out n*ru, 
and *oeh on* of them tighti to th* tcif d*fdt on4 
»tone, rather than give up! 

The fight that we're fighting ii hard, and w* era 
going to (*t no One point it in roty h*#i. W« henr* 
found out that the German* do not tight with paper* 



lithe Genu ant rcoNy afeiudi miierab'e, Wtafc hHt* r u - 
-then w*mu3Tb#thftw«k#*tfltfii]flr!0M.-K# H hat ret/*' 
y«orf ior ui to got even within j moiling 4*i*Qncc ■?♦ Nt** 
What in Hell'* 





bullet;, ca rdb acHreVtonht 

and io r> wh jipe-r i, but with 
weoponi to powerful and 
tafribl* that the fountain- 
pen genii ot home would 
taint to HiJnk of Mimn. 
We hov# no illusion} about The itr*ngtti and moroE* o' Our oppo 
nenii, ond call o i po d e a t pod e, oi ths quo tqtto nslrom man who I now 
what they or* taihing abo^t in the following peget wifl oanply pro*r> 



, , *nd Hi'"* h fh > m <tf w« -O'U* »« Am* «s" t.[»*. 

>oan}U»l Wodd»j» ihmk 6' ■*.o" 



Tiic German «oldion Oi the front seas tKcm 

'lOwfP tint*! 
i « *lWOn lOWttfr* Itt-fnnj ti->-ir boj*M]o*hi 

full toiimwi and ore MMtail^i w£y wr)l eracir;. 



Dw4>b tt" ' jtihriQ ki Sk By, : -iofce<* V f«* n». 

pa uctiure rraor>» twn- ddendinrj th» MfaJwfrj 
of I alarum D'ldon feitrt^d *tinp fcKiQhir^r guy» 
that *r have y#t rn»*' r 

fv». Mike Cohen, Brooklyn N, V^ w/itci from 
Sicily "Doy c*ter day w* Imd oui ihor the 
itrrtf\ arr dumried >gOud ioIiJi*^*, H laaki at 
thouoh lh- promised >alk ro flrrhin' wiEl Kavq 
lO L be povri>an#d far □ bil. r n ik« Fait t* w davi 
"•'vr loit Q lr>l of frn« b<hyi. ,* 

Geneml Montgomery 
i 'a "ed ■ n a war r or r e i 
*po-ijrif "Afton- 
falodef, Sieckhoiriti 
on .Augutr 2nd ''Tht 
Germovi*, Cr , t s t,i| rhp 
lorn*. T"H*y are ent- 
huiltairir and rdnnfi 
col do'«t«vilt.ldon t 
tike 'he Ottmom, 
bvt 'he Germans con 
* tight." 
In hit ipeech on the 
military tituah'on on 
July27lh m3,Chur 
■chiil comment* d at 
teJIowi on the 0#'- 
mon army "TheOer- 
man ormiet ore jiifk 
in red and ihow no 
%:gni of crocking. 
Hiiier hot mar* than 

300 dfiiioni at hit (ftmm&nit, end mflif ot 
■ -f t, ore >till well eDutppeo\" 

Generol MacNolr wrote in 'lite" of June 'Otn, 
1 Wl3 "There ii no ■widen;* for the weakening 
of moral i- or ony felling oil of th* will Ki fighl 
in;the Q*ttr>on army. Oerntoji hraoat ha^e 
Of/om and again fovQM w«M pnd with ntfie<ity 
and itaperotion ogointt rhe Soviet Union and 
the iritiih and Ammummt - end often In the 
toe* of preet luoenontv th* German equip 
men* n (till excellent. Tht Ownon ortitlery hat 
Og i lumped oil our tVeM fvnt. Iti backbone it 





"0»l;r * <Ml«4 >»<iH i| tmHi 
tl#H" ->( rtt* *3*>fan *rwj , **■' 



-n a emttef 

ledL" 1 

the '^'ee^pur 
posifrgmn ntflO 
> lW mw >* *!>**- 
rrpmciy uj^etul 

r*i AmvVejb> 
craft. anti-Ian k H 
it field gun, 
ISe German 
airplanei are 
\p1tmU4, TheFockv tffytf ■» a b^"n P Rghrtl 
■High the ftfJt*ih £p,tfiK ^ond ikrfHet ih«Ji the 
^ ipju'-rc , m th* 00- 

niOnOf AUierfpilori 

f*iio» Sfltgn-i 
Uom 0, Hfirr n d Cohf, 
in a letter ra hn bfi 
dr ro-br- "Ths tJcr- 

Tf" mgktllighten 
povnia o^tf» like rhe 
dWilhimtrlf. trlLOnn 
ot ihf >i vht;*-- 
two mO'e turn jp, 
Thcji 1 new rOCt«C4 &nrf 
new weopont ftre 
having a tcrribTe «f 
feet On Our fed*. 

The mifilory critic O* 
the TNew York He- 
rald Tritjn«' L , Maror 

George fielding Eli'Ot. 

w^otecmJ^ y27M - 
". . .The flghc.nig Ipirit 

hoi 'Ol Owe*- nraktn There Ore furtha'^Ore 
no report* from Germour that fhe morcttr of 
■fie civilian etOpulai>on has be«n oraken " 

"New York Timet", in a report frum Fh* front 

"The mililory opera riOni hpve prO*«d Over and 

Over aooih that lh» Germoni are eicellait 

loidfen, et rhe whoF* world kiwi e*«* 

furthermore." 

In hn book -One Worfd H f V' 

auotei the following tlol 

Monrgomewy J left you 







"I tell you, th-Mft Garment or* downed good ioldi*?r 



, »,, j.» ~ . 



A S T A T E M E 



. 




US Brigadier General FredKOsbomeA 
Special Service Drv, in me DepK of War, \f\ 

pubftjhed n the 'Stfurday Ev»>*«> Potf", Mow-ng the Gen«ri» 
goHon Into the moiota of the American (rood -n Europe 
" Men* ieierieeiie f» ireiform do not »*on- H f I) 

admit th»t ihn do not knov rtiv Hint should 

not MpW /taW •#•'"»' "'« Si'™*'-' itfim IMH^ 

o/ tiermmn}/." 

BUT THE GERMAN SOLDIER KNOWS 
WHAT HE IS FIGHTING FORI 

Me is defending his count 'v. »» 
his family and his home 

1AND YOU?! 

WHY ore you m Eufooe ? 

WHY or* you in uniform iftfeod of m you/ ove< ;i ji bui.-neu iu*i? 

W H Y or* you trudging along or to ram-tooked mjuntar oc'i-.i of 
(toJy, «Wl death It lurtmg around every comer » 

WHY oi« you rtormlrtg acton bul l e t m e f X forefieldi le i„ng behind 
hundred* of dead ond wounded *ach hire < 

IEUUSE rhe wor-tneten, led by SooMeet, kruch. Morge-,rh at ,. F.anfc- 
(urhK ond CQiwoirt, po;iooed fa we d CB with rhen '.:ewont war 
piopogonda No* they are reaokig eateewl piofffe "-.-n THE* war. 

For this le 



THIWCHMAM'lWAt »<f TH3 FOCft MAM'S PIOKTt 



■ 



J f 7- - • ' 1 . 



F.D.R. LEAVES THE VETS liN THE LURCH. 

AN INTERESTING COMPARISON. 

I he Washington lovfrnirin.t stated nlfii iallv »n January J\ 1' 1 ! i 
th.il the number of wounded men in' thr U. S. E'lfjhtinv 
I ones Kail reached the figure of 

47,123. 

Now we read En the "New York Times" that 
Mr. Atherton, commander of the American 
Legion, said in a broadcast over a San lun- 
cisco station that 

ovtr 100,000 wounded men 

had already gone the Iocs way from the front 
via the main dressing atation and the casualty 
clearing atation aero** the sea to the home 
hospitals. Thus Atherton, who should know 
what be U talking about, 

mor • than doubled 
the official figures ! 

Vet, he spoke only of those men wo returned 
and made no mention or the one hundred 
thousand wounded or aide soldier*, wbo are 
still lying low in many part* of the globe with 
no chance to got home, owing to the lack of 
hospital ship*. 

The Legion commander also revealed that 
more than 70#000 wounded had been 
discharged a* unfit for service. 

Thh /fflure ofone exceeds the officio,," 
admmmd number of wounded by 50%. 



1 



IN CONCLUSION Athene* *»t ih. 

idequ*te measure* on hehelt ef'tlie .1 ■•..iiie.i *«i votei-n 







After their discharge the vets 
were forced to live for many 
months on charity 
or on their own savings. 

lie added that the wets were <-ntitlrd to a 

small pension. 

Payments, however, would start only 4 to 7 

months later, 

lo make things worse, the allowance to thi*ir 

families was stopped on the da\ of their 

discharge. 



Meanwhile many vets and their dependents 
would sink into poverty. 

So far Mr. Atherton. 

A wounded sergeant who re- 
cently returned from the Sol- 
omon Islands put it, according 
to the "Washington Post", in no 
uncertain term* - 
" Why are we to make all these 
sacrifices ? 

"Why are we to go through hell, 
while this thankless and heart- 
less crowd of home - warrior* 
and war - profiteers (tick to 
their good jobs and stay in 
their comfortable homes, 

off of them mating a pile of dough. 







))• 



*> 



AMERICA'S SACRIFICES 





Millions of American soldietv w.11 die ui 
return as ceipples before this greatest < 
wars is over. Millions o| families are 
separated by the war Millions of women are 
toiling in noisy and unhealthy writ factories 
They can no longer 



go shopping at leisure 

in ihe afternoon. They 

have no time left for 

their children There 

are no more happy 

motor ndes with th» (amity, weekend 

parties or vocation trip* — neither [or 

, them nor for you. There ii leu clothing, 

and nice things an hard to ge*. 





If you are lucky enough 
to return you will face 
HARD TIMES. There will 
be UNEMPLOYMENT 
on e gigantic scale for 
marry years when the 
war plants close down. 



-AND WHY SUCH SACRIFICES? 



The American standard of living? 



■" fi '£j£$& i 3 



foftoAm 



The entire national wealth 
o| the country rS b^iivi 
grabbed by WAR PROFIT 
EERS. Bejore rkelKef s 
over there will be a (Ml 
ionel debt of over one 
hundred billion dollars I 
Not even your children's 
children can hope to pay off such an inconceivable sum with 
taxes. This greatest debt on earth can be eliminated only by 
INFLATION which will wipe out all your savings and render 
your insurance policies worthless. 



A liberal constitution ? 7%. 




Democracy was secretly abol- 
ished end replaced by govern- 
ment regimentation, 30.000 new 
laws and regulations already 
interfere with everything. 
Washington " gas bags " ere 
controlling the press, the motion 
pictures and the radio stations. 
They are feeding everybody with 
war propaganda end lies in 
order to "keep the pot boiling". 










A I ■Ji: 3 ti 





afout. the 'recent 0erm4w raids (Ht oQw& 



QUOTATIONS FROM UNIMPEACHABLE SOURCES 



Keut&r after the mid am tin.' night of / vh J*- If, 



In ihv early hwjri *k! Snlurda.v thv CiffflMM *wnii! nut i!-i- b#**in4 r»W 
uin*7* H4C 41 in urdcr In art Ltmdun nn fire. 'Firj tFrupftrtl «* irtitfr rmrl-ikri i>F 
H- I 1 , And incrtfxdtni'-/ luilith* ihruu.h lli*r hcMs s V, \. heir miff '*' 'h* ^ fl " >h ' 1 '" 
I Mpi defence*. The flint lt)titi:d Fur **n hum it rid lirv» wrr* -.tntlcd at «H 
|Kji*ta of Ihe CDHipua, NumiroiiH huildiiii<Ji **rrc hit niul l + nr haUiiik [inrlu* 
wet* wliFI m\ work at d«jv.n. 



Svensia Dagbladet after the mxj on iiw k„,m of i -■/.. iv .9. 



H. h', a Had incendiarie« ruined di**«n Mi Luntton. t iinlgv"'''"!^ I** up hmdj 
diaJHcIa »o brigiitly That ran did no I need Ihcir Jt«(ii1 'fifhlii. All t»er londun 
many people were buried under the dvbfi-. 



D. D. C, after f«W raid on f/*e Rfyftl of I eh, ? ?5. 



Heavy It, fc, ** and inrendiarfca *>cf* (.rouped in many London ilia-ln*-!-. I) im- 
age eaueedl waa consider* bir. 



lAffonbfcxJeT^ 



er //it raid or* the night of March 1-3, 



lieravan tneendiariea alarled laryc Area En certain London d.airlcIV Long ftJlei 
the a H -dear Ihv «lyy •*** rtddiufd by the glow of pxltn»i»e Rre», Damage 
CJtiiacd i*«n heavy: I Sere were many eaaualtfea. the raid w» one of I he hv*\ - 
ie*. ever made. A what* induatrioi area uf Iroadon waa Mined l)(J t 



FoJJrats DogbJodat^fivr i/<« r*« on the . 



ii|/ft of March 14-IS 



Ih* (ltd si HW tiirmnn raid* an Laaidaa im much mrc uricut lUn <hr llrit- 

>•>> •ulh„illlf« wwh Id admit. Il k *ta*fally b*H*>rd thai lh<r rrcvnl raidi 

were only ■ rah«ar*al for nvv* atMvtlla. 

Ilea waa II psaalblc (or (lie German nlaae* le ny umhamnrnd over London t 

TKal i» * hat e*erybod\ J» aaliJna; nowaday*. 

* ill II j * hyaterla baa rvecntly increased roaaldvrably. 



CHURCHILL: "it's just like old times a~^3 




D O N ' T. $ E A D IT! 
You may get the blues. 

This is a bit of poetry by an American soldier. 
Hwe it is: 

Sometrhere in Italy 11 f'tb.e Ike day* are like a curne. 
and each one is followed htj another •iliuhtty worse, 
where the cold wind blown heavier than the nhijlhtfi 
, . -. desert sand, 

and a soldier dreams and wishes tor a quiet and peace- 
ful land- 

Somen here in Italy where the nights are made for /ore. 
ii here the moon is like a searchlight and l/i« 4 Southern 

Cross j bo vi' 
sparkles like a diamond necklace in a balmy tropic niiiht. 
it's a shameless waste of beauty n/ien i here's not a girl 

'.'. in sight. 

Somewhere in Italy where the mail is always late, 
where a Christmas card In April is considered up-to-date, 
where we never harm a payday and we never have a cent, 
but me never miss the money 'cause we'd never gel it spent. 

v • 

Oh. lake ma bach to Michigan, Jet roe hear that mission bell, 
for this God-forsaken foxhole i> a substitute for hell. 

DO YOU THINK voififi PA' 









Jtiitm S F HO NT 

withe, to Cfti your »ilen I, on lo the following BROADCASTS 

ENTERTAIN YOU: 



\ 



is xi ii ns 



&CC to 7*C w. 



M. V 
31. 34.6 



for Aim btlmri who Ilk* to 
and n)or r*oale fa 



lO rOiil'UwJ. 



&30 ; w 7 JO iu>. 



in 



3S 
J*.* 



Tr* bit •how <boA dwitarfe. to Hod. 
Sara. ta» wnk SAUV, JERRY. OEOROE, 
PETE. OUDVS. OSCAR THE SWINCINO 
TIGERS. AMERICAN RECORDS. THE 
LATEST NEWS and " 
l«la Ilka ankmllnf i 



IG75 to 11£C mi. 



449.1 



M. M 
396 



A tprttmi protraio tor Ik* Brill* torn. 



l»r#S 



h> midnight 



430 H 
Itv I 



IN. SI 
39,6 



»1lfi ■ tew ovwt Iw/Ora. 



MCto MC an,. 



38 

3*6 



Our nlghl-blrdu* aho* with lovHy fll'i a wlljr 
von fon'l a*r herlr hwaky-volnd HEIFN 
eondDcltaf I lie ppDrredlno. You boya who 
MifTt-r froio Inaomnla (ti will feel brtarr *ll- 
ApMcw toward* I he Garaun fannera who 
ktep yn awoke 1 



Wilt, b* kind to your ieti, boyi. 
kMp off rhe BBC italic *nd litis n lo 



jerry 






BEWAI 

JEfv^Y (the guy you are fighting) is p. 
FIVE BROADCASTS 

at 6:00 a.m.: Mcdiumwave: 420.8 mete™ Shon 

at 6; 30 p. m.: Medium wave : 221 and 449.1 meters Short v 

at 10:1 5 p. m , : Medium wave : 4203 and 449.1 meter* Short v«w 

at 1 1 :45 p.m. : Medium wave : 420.B and 449.1 meter* Short wave : 

at 2.00 a.m.: Medium wave: 221 and 449.1 meters Shortwave: 2 

The American dough buy'"'»nd Toipimy Atkin* am duly warned that aucl 
deetgned to mtokad and trtek them under the cover of entertainment 

Don't listen to Sally, Jerry. George, Pete, Glad/*, Oecar, the Swinging ' 
the rest, but stick to the 

British Bunking Corporate 

•Mt «fft train *m jm Ik "Ufe Utiep Itut «nt tt»t' « -_* 

here YOU are : 




V 




NEWS FROM HOME 





Humour Corrected 

l riminaiiti ->ii. ( > (V AnnHim rm^mn ttt IWpl.»in ha* NW 
i'Kf*»wO bf 4S^ */*p ** rwil t'*PK "*"'') rleiiwaU *i*ii In HiftintaJP. 
Thi* ■» * grot* «uftntHMi I nub i* 451 * . 

Mtatt CUt* Hcafikd am* dlrllk^jiilBfifi -ndl ■* tHrfiipled 
taf¥, hpwIi <*f JihMihii |irU MB. Ii mum* be jhji-l. 4 ...<l rb*l an 
**luab*t* w*r* itoka ft"»n iheie nirl. ■ vkkh ft p»oafo t ihe ideal* 
Ktk pvlKIpUri of AM'Ii ft* B<r« with IU. 

TVa majority of EBfU.h i.*U, ban. ever, I< coe**nVr*te to the 
Kfallii} be -toe* knm IB* t/^A end I hut dti peseta with any oW.*v*U> 
Tfc*| ttf rintna; (Mil paHioCIc bit tir dn ma* 1 MimnalM 1 . 



A tie* *UAt|>k af EaftU** k**pitaJrt* bat brew fi**o b) lj. 
S. Wuumj *n>r U> tie mad an1w 4 Ihhbc o« teeer. He femd 
b»- wVt i*t Wwt to — V J Bat fall- Ml-MaT ka, WWJ, — J tit- 
c*H«ancc*. He i«oUy a»t • Doa't atoll *v « yaart» ■ (**•" W 
Brit*** " > 

ABil the* W ajettt afl far M boa*** arajfc, 

I hffr'k bw .J..*.* itoivf N - LL VaW'i ft MaWji * I 



* * - - ■ ^»^1 ■ ■ - ,r - - * 1 I 

MOrv f co rMfwrav nvrv i 





„"Y «■* *> —* *•** "^'1 W* JMIHlm •% t*4 to uhkrmuol 
iW JlMl f*'»t* »f A* UoibHl K«t"*>. Kumcrw h>rmi bid u> 
Im Ito) to u4 to* vtth by At mUittn •utiomm 

So iiV wliMrfii* fc* *»wy fvilongfcimu in EsgUsil lu rmf up 
l« tW HUM U> MM my fMfrian at h.-tar. 



P. M. and BaMmiiM - hychiatriav finding* 



Wt .iloaai Oh «ae4 am la A* •»•■« J«t bawl by iki* 
•f ahtva't barivf Mm vkUMi •■klbonat Mr. CtorcbiU'l 
In an -pl.lrt e* fctiWHui t» kh mW hM> u to H<h. 

I Fee » r»«" Mr. Uiirciiill ■•!•«•< wd tk>t Sullii l> ih, grwm 
I bj lnHVJ. tbjd Bofcbfvftqiv <■ ih? mi*™ of rlrlL- 



4cti«l Dm nUU Ibu 4>"t*f i»h Htktd t *i! 





HIADiRS LITTEB 

Pftv«rTienj Polilfness 

J -i:. ad i-n^ti-h MiJiJii-r ■ '■■me* lirf^ 1 *n Ir-tli , ' 
M» pvnaii ■.**?■ -HnifLnh, ihi c'avit|]«T>'nl^ »>» Kr.|j' 
1i»t b 410 ait mi utotiH*, n»u, ntKi !■.'»■« t«* ih> 
I : fc (4%to»| 

t >v**e n-.n, fu*,] fcime btKa trym l#aiv m !■ nj:- 
.^■t. \n4 iEut* 1* ■■!!.' t^n; f|n- nt--!j jjujr'iui^ ie»f anil 
|u which' niita»'t h*r ^ei'it-cn ahie |a |[itt ar j nl- 
Iriititnry answer. Hf.ir. it i»: 

* Sluit I vlaav/i nidke .■■--■■m for ihe Aii^fn-n 
-.aklieft tti thr street ^ ■ 

Darto| my Jute 1 bad 10 wiJb mft*l t>* ibr utnt 
in the gutter ■ ju*l bex AV ie the AiwfHan* beha.Tf 
«• if 'ii^- oevei m mc r I alwipa bad to juinjp b4 
ihe |Mv-nieat *t (be lul mument- 

Sir - lihy, irb h whjf : 



/„ ff. 



I dW iiitA'fi- Mttpiitti' 



Yt», w* ore tfVaid )h«l this is now unovoid* 
ubJe - even if it purs you in a difficult pcvi^n 
We EnqUiH have A proud polt bui fKe A-T*e* - 
com ho*e a fUTUflt For our capabl*. bnimpeoch 
eble Governntenl hoi placed rhe Old Country 
Jock, stock end barrel ol lh» diiPOMl 0| the USA 
to be uted 91 militof/ ba» 

We English myjfnow, ot long Lett, overcorne 
our Ireditronal pride in Empire, for we no long. 
#r poueu on Emp^e - it has long «go bee^> 
pawned 10 Well Street. Thai * why wm musibe 
pohle and C0flUd*r#t# io American totdteri ovef 
here ai repreienioivei of Wall Stieel 

Enghih soldiers should now follow the ^xnm- 
pk *et by thai r woman loli who g'v« fha Amarican 
iroops of; occupation all fhal rivty have W* £ng- 
Uth must realise thai wt now mean to the Anw- 
icam what ihe Poiei maanl 10 ut m 1939. 

So we must wibngly do ow eeje osi ■ doa^rf 
die m order to complete the flnei^aoje ofWI 
atn't Icmg hiHOfy ond pave fht»J«y )of lh# Aft*/ 
•C4HI Canlury, ' 



•U 



u U. 




•s 

1 






V 



f f e* 



ft , „ /D u :^ ; "' ! " ! s . ^ p» A n c = 
I I THE VOSGES AND 
ALSACE CAMPAIGNS 
15 AUG 1944 - 20 MARCH 1945 




I 




Q J's /mw ^0tf em figured it out* 



70 American men out of a hundred 
ai* enioyina peace La civil life; 

22 are training and stationed back 
home: 
6 are doing the; 3 bit oversea* — 

Q men oat of a hundred art 
mgagtd in actual fighting. 

Some 60 division* have reached me 
fronts: combat t:oops as well as service 
unils, totalling more than 

2 iSSOOG officer* and men 
accompanied these divisions abroad 

Adding me million men oi ihe Aii Forces 
then is a total ol 3OS5 0OO GF« on the 
world'* battle fronts- 

CStcm add Strip* £*pi ffl. pao* u 
1 



And only about hatf of these are doing 
ihe grim, nasty job of actual lighting. 

Almost every day you front-line men 
lead o( people at home leaving wot 
job* (or something mote tecuie which 
will carry them trough the post-war 
period 

For you the advice of these people is: 
Keep soldiers In the Army alter 
the war till fob* can be secured, 
tor them. 



Zhz draft-dodgers at home 

expect mrij 'joe to do Uis duty! 



«?*s\ 





p 



# 



. - ^ ' jsure you ... 

w 13 assure you... 
*<" I assure you... 

I assure you... t 

I assure you... 

assure you... 

I assure you... 



V 



BUEl (£ljirofl0 $»% Qr&tmt [fj^ 



THE, BLOODSTAINED HAND 




Smutos €titwitd& 

Md Juttbg fUf«f« 













f 




faring lifted 



wi;r£«N ii."-*<t 



Ww ft bm 



Five months in regions of ice, 
snow, and bitter cold t 





N#. /*. '** 



s^it h i , As -* At J rw 



What will it all come tat 



• 



> 



- 

liljj fM t it j^i fi ^iii>nr !'■ 

-fcfib ff* fit**- t 

. 1 -_Tt mf^i li lM KM 

- 



V- gv, jlgf 



n : * 




Tomorrow's Politics Without lis? ' 



-. I OTlMjUp 



, A 






Wrdl (fog think 

m ih* (ml Una 



tn\tU'mx a Ftura 



Bombt tor de &auii*» 



a^wrfn..*, !!,,;« WORLD AKD WA» 

NEWS 











But, both ttr* Hick of it 






Winter h*» came 



H A -»-.,- 



M. *V» L*— 1 .i« i.m, p.Ffc. n , 



iri* tar,* 



— r-te3BT.-T5= — 



a. 



fl0i?M#0#£te>! 



.!■■• No- H ■ r; j.) 



V/EjTFkhf FKO!^T 



N.w il"V IW 



Robot Planes - an unpleasant weapon 

iNvbsd* 1/iowi *kcj'* p"j.ri com* ifrftff - A»id fliJ* V If J 

T>» 1MI« MH WO H al ■!•».•- ■> - I . •*••*••< g oi*-->,<i TVw ASM aMJiMIn I* M<" *t 1- MI WH 

" H '1 -■ uaHMfm ...tkiiflh ... ■'. *■ I .!■ L- | p r.-. Ml 

■t4w*k-*u>I ■ ft .i jt«t* I •m*Ur .WtanT.4 a. a*(| .■ i.iMivii 

i.ltiii,lHii)w.'i'.><Wf|(MiF4 -"-T+ vi 4 J*h.i ,f *r ikp.d !•«•*■, mi lU CTlaartal M*i aUUfaa. 
- a*i ■* Ohm. kk%MB tMilu^ ad 'n«tn mill '» * ffWr*|**Jmr> ivli-TU.irawlni.bii 




HSU J --'' 

•nip h n» 



i. i* _ 

ffMhrialllml < M1 il * t b>tt |f* -"I" ■ 




wf Hun muni ikxMHiiit « m -i, 



■k-ffcTTi ►%*»-* pin "ft »»'; t -i 

>MM min i t-*7 ■* nini 

■ ■" *r ha -a». *+-m ' l\» r L - '£ 



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Zan office tt sand $t*atw§* 
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The Ship of State sprtnus % leak 



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WISHING Wl 





Wouldn't it be nice to see the Big City again, 
to rub elbows with the crowd on Broadway, to 
see the "French Follies", and to have a highball 
with a girlfriend at some bar on 52nd street? " 

There are plenty of guy* who are enjoying all 
this. They are those fellows who stayed behind, the 
draft dodgers and the boys who took your jobs. 

All you are supposed to do is to fight for them, 
not knowing whether you'll live to see tomorrows 
sunrise, while they are hawing a swell time. 






• 




Hold on to it! 



7* 



SAFE CONDUCT 



Tha Ananoan *old;ar who cnzriai thii ula ooaducl u wing 


il u « lign oi hit gamiina with Id giva 


huuaU wp. Ha ii to 


be diianred, to fas nil loolad *ftai, 


to raraiva lood tad 


madio*l atr*ntion u roo^iirad, Mid to ba ntaond {ids tha 


dangai 


son* u qntcttr u 


ponibla. 


Goanuilaad m^^ 


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br tha |kg^^4nTi^ 


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Wati AiuiatMpJ 




<^7 


» Wtit-AmiMn 



Th« following tmulatiofi ii to inform rft* Cartuit otiipostii 

PASSIERSCHEIN 

Dar amaiikaiuacha Soldat, dar diaian Fauiarichaip Torxaigi, 
haniim Lhtt «!• Z<-tch«n iein» aJulichan WilLtm, rich n ar* 
oaban, Er iti in i-niwalimen. Er muB gui bahandall watda». 
Ei H»i Ampiuch aul Verpilaguno, und, waiuv notig, inlUcha 
Bahandlung. Ei wild » ichnall wi« nwglich sot dai Ga- 
lahianwna anHwni. 







THE MAN WHO 
PROMISED THAT 
NO AMERICAN 
WOULD BE SENT 
T O FIGH T 
OUTSIDE THE U. S. 



THE MAN 

WHO SAD) THAT 

O.S. SOLDIERS 

WQOLD BE 

DEMOBILIZED 

WITHIN 

A FEW WEEKS 



THE MAN WHO WILL BE RE-ELECTED 



REMEMBER HIMl 
HE PROMISED THE SAME 
THINGS AND HE. TOO, BROKE 
HIS PROMISE 








Answered by a reader of the "Time* Star* in a letter doled al the 
end of August 1944: 

In 1940 America had not yet decided either for isolationism or inter- 
nationalism. The proof of this Is In the vote of the Democratic Party 
Convention In June 1940 not to send a second American expedi- 
tionary corps to Europe. It that's no isolationism, then I don't know 
what it isl 

Afterwards cam* the President's assurance to American mother* and 
fathers that their sons would never fight on foreign soil. In addition 
there were many other isolationist declarations. 

In 1940 the President appeared to be Isolationist in order to be elected 
a third time. Once elected he went over completely to the inter- 
nationalist camp. And now his propaganda says how important 
it will be to elect him a fourth time in order to bring peace and 
wellbeing to the people. But what he really wants is to be the 
dictator of a totalitarian state. 

In the autumn of 1940 Roosevelt ceded SO destroy j to the British 
Fleet in spite of his pre-election promise and without the assent of 
Congress. In addition, he concluded an agreement with a foreign 
power. Iceland, by which he sent American troops there. He hoped 
they would be attacked at the same time as the Canadian troops 
stationed in Iceland, and thus create a pretext for war. Later he 
gave the order to fire which had as result the torpedoing of the 
destroyer Rouben Jones. 

Already in June 1939 Roosevelt had definitely oriented America to- 
ward war during the visit of the King and Queen of England who 
came uniquely to see if England would be aided by the USA. In 
case of war. After Roosevelt had given the assurance that U.S.A. 
would back up England completely, the later declared war is Sep- 
tember 1939. 

The Pearl Harbor scandal must also be cleared up because we 
believe the people ought at least to know why they or* in the war. 

L Stahi 
303 Covert Run, Belle vue K y . 



MeseaHQ 




DIVINE 



t 



SERVICE 



US. P. o. W. are attending DIVINE SERVICE in 
our P, o. W. camp i. 

Just one we never tee it's the Jewl 

We are wondering WHY! Aren't any Jew* In 
your fighting line? Or are they afraid, after cap- 
ture, to admit their faith? They thouldn't say they 
are afraid to admit their faith, became they know 
that soldiers captured, regardless of religion, are 
treated according to the convention* of Geneva 
and the Hague. 

But YOU know, why Jew* aren't found 
amongst you. 

Because they let YOU fight their "pretty war"! 
Let YOU go to Hie front to take part in c.ssault ., . 
parties, let YOU "enjoy" front life, let YOU get 
wounded, or die for THEIR 

"WAR of LIBERATION"! 





To the Jewish race liberation means nothing 
but destroying industry, and eiiminoting fair com- 
petition in production and trade in Europe. The 
entire market of Europe under Jewish control 
means more 

MONEY 

for them. Europe h . -it supposed to buy from them. 
With what? Wilh borrowed money? 

If European deots ore sky high, stagnation of 
trade, throttling o- production, unemployment, and 
misery will take- -he place of prosperity in 

USA! 

Ana YCU? YOU keep on fighting) 
While, In the meantime, all Jew) sitting bock 
home, enjoy home life, "entertain" YOUR 
wives, and YOUR daughters, or keep them 
busy, producing 

WAR SUPPLIES 

to prolong the war - and so, to shovel 
ail the Gold, the "Jewish God"! 








j!y& y*% wtotitr^M iMpk ? 



15 1 




Tha fallowing iT«ml»iiori it to inlorm lha GarmM outpotu ■ 

PASSIERSCHEIN 

Dar am«irik»nijchii Soldi i, dar dienn Funanahain lorteigl, 
ban out ihn all 3>jehan Hum ahilichen Willem, nch n at- 
gnbaiv Fj in in antwaffnen. Er aaufl gut bahmndalt warden. 
Ef hat Aiuprueh anl VerplUgung and, *«nn notig, intJicke 
Bahandlung. at wird io schnal) wia moglioh am dar Ge- 
fafaaruona anllarnl. 




AMERICAN SOLDI KltS! 



She wanted to spend her life in 

peace and happiness by the side of 

her husband. .. 

NOW HE WILL NEVER COME BACK! 

Far away from his country and his 

people he was sacrificed for foreign 

interests on the battlefield. 

HOW MANY AMERICAN WOMEN ARE 

already waiting in vain for their 
husbands? fto+4 many mothers for 
their aorta, and how many girls for j 
their sweethearts 7 

What about the girl you love? Wu> v 



the also belong to thoae 

WAITING IN VAN? 



*jk" 




y- 



& 



• - 



1 pi 

Everyjstep 




.—. ^ 



f 



t* 



- 



ThU U 

fututei* 
made— 



+•'4 



THE PoW LIFE ASSURANCE CO. 

No Premium j to Pay 

Insurance statistics show that the 

average American reaches an age of . 60,5 years 

The average Gl Joe in combat 

reaches an age of .......... 23,2 years 

Therefor© PoW* live longer by .... 37,3 years 

All German PoW Camps are run on the 
Geneva Convention plan 

14 




litis is >&Uat youe ww&* Ohd mt&tfi wtiU: 







■//it'?'*'*' -xf 



Wc were eUd to 
heir that you will 
behome soon. You 
kntnv we asked the 
board here when 
you were coming 
home iod it il- 
wsyv says in No- 
vember- Geo we 
hope it's the truth. 
Aug 30. 1944 




I wish you could 
come home. You 
have been across 
8 months, I hope 
and pray you'll 
be home before 
the next 8 months. 

Aut 1*. 19« 












Snn, tarn praying 
far you to you can 
be home with ii* 
won . From Mother 
that Love you ir>. 
Aug 22. 1944 



You my you would 
tike i home too- 
tt'ell 
William J *ure 
wiih you were 
home To hiiV' MMb 
Well by the look- 
«f ihiny- jT wont 
belunghefan:iti<s 
tivpr Til keep my 
finger-, irrosurti. 
Aug 30s 1944 



Just watch your- 
■'J[ and I horx- 
ihtt letter liruh 
the w»r over 
when you gel U- 
Aug 2*, ImH 




Darlings 1 cUtTl 
■, arc if you bring 
hnnii- *n¥ iOUVc- 
■■■■if Irani those 
huri but all I a*lt 
is to bring your- 
■elf home to us. 
sS-t- B. 1444 





7^^^*/f*-^> Ca4^-^04 



Gee, were you happy then . , .1 Together, you spent marvellous 

timet . . ., bunging on the beaches . . , , dancing, enjoying parties 

galore . . , , listening to the runes of your favorite band . . . 



It's all over now! 

Sie expects you back noma am eey, ■ 
the k wetting lor you, day by day, 
she b longing far you, night by night. 



But in vain I 

You are gone, perhaps far ever . . . 
You had 16 faeve her, Id fight for Europe. 



Plain wooden 



But why? 

of your pob aro no 

row*w m^k wiaXT 



on fofoipjn soil* 



What are YOU going to do 
about it? 



rik .*:— L 






■ 



Congress has voted a law entitling 

Gold Star Mothers 

to a free trip to Europe after the War. 




IS THIS 

TO BE 

YOUR MOTHER? 



i ._. 








(Muddy, fare is an idea ! 
GET IT ? 



I 




12* 






\ 



III 




_ c r* CONDUCT 

a Auafion hUuk who cuiwi ibis wf* i»»<Jkci i> ottog 
.t «• » Jiffn ct hit genuine wish to gin hi»j*U a-y. H> ta to 
ba dimnaacl ts faa w*B touted %it*t, to naivi toad usd 
wJIwl attaflbo* *» nqaind. end n> ba jaowae'd fww tiut 
ma «f quicktf M yauibla. 



OfwahitaiuM 




Otwbai.hkh.bat 

tint Intittsbttti 



Th* loflowing imfitlntion ii to inform th& German output j" 

PASSIERSCHEIN 

Dw *meriluinnr>ie Soldai. dm djottfi P*«i«no1win YQruigr. 
b*nul*l ih* hit ZeicJwfi uinti ehrftcW WiUttn*, ikfc ju « 
g«boiv Ei ill tu aRlwattnen, Er «ofl gul bfth*ni*h *urri*rt. 
D hit Anjproch tuf Varpflvgun^ iind, wbiui nblig, aQdlicha 
&*h»ridiuri9 Jj wtrtt so vchn-fclt wia mogJich hiu d» Ci*- 
fahr*niOn#> ■mitral* 



f * 




'The wdr will be over 
in six months" 

That's what Montgomery told you, and the 
whole machine of British and American propa- 
ganda tried to make you believe that it would 
now be over in no time. 

To you it may have looked like it for some d£ys. 
But instead of breaking down German resistance 
is stiffening again. It will stiffen the more the 
nearer you come to the German border defense 
lines. 

Then, every mountain will be a fortress. Every 
fortress will be defended to the last. You don't 
know whether you can conquer them. Butyou know 
that thousands of you will never see their families 
again, that thousands will be maimed for life. 
Only P. o. W. will return home safe and sound. 







". ". 






' I, I 



' ■' 






:■'■ 



k- 



,. jj : 
* . 

■ 



%\ fill 



COMBINED ARMS RESEARCH LIBRARY 
FORT LEAVENWORTH, KS 



3 1695 00539 1743 



Nov. 1045 

Essllngen, Germany